To improve confidence in proper responses to stimuli, rehearsal is king. The more frequent, the more recent, and the more realistic the practice is, the more likely it will be successful. The more it strokes the same neural pathways that will be used in real life, the more likely it will be recalled.

Our products reduce training time while improving outcomes. Less re-training expense is a welcome by-product of adding real-time iPad-based training tools.

 

Environments like aviation are especially sensitive to having confidence in timely, correct pilot reactions. The very rarity of these situations demands rehearsal to counter skill decay. Existing training environments may provide as few as one physical refresher training in a year, and even in those, only a fraction of possible scenarios can be rehearsed.

While we can’t dole out multi-million dollar simulators to everybody, we can do a lot with the tablets fielded in many industries, starting with aviation.

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Response Confidence

Our goal is to improve confidence in crew member responses. Guided, graded practice is a powerful tool help.

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Learn, Practice, Test

A tutorial guides crew members through required actions first, highlighting each control or place to look and waiting for input. Then they can practice in real time but still seeing the hints. When ready, they test themselves and must make the correct decisions followed by the correct actions.

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iPad & Virtual Reality

Programs are built for iPad and Virtual Reality (VR). The iPad greatly helps instill confidence in procedure while VR helps with muscle memory.

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Response Confidence

Using company-required iPads, pilots are placed in a 3D cockpit modeled after their company’s aircraft. Relevant controls and indications work. Pilots start in a normal phase of flight, then something happens—both sights and sounds—like a compressor stall on takeoff. They must react appropriately using various controls as they would in the real airplane. In this case, if the engine were to continue running, they would be expected to continue.

Our training solutions exercise decision making, then action. It requires correct procedural steps to be taken for a successful outcome. They rehearse where to look, where to reach, and what to do when facing various stimuli. By responding in real-time, they improve reaction time in ways that are not possible otherwise. And in more scenarios.

A random element is available to help ensure no two practice sessions are exactly alike—decision trees must be used every time. They are timed, scored, recorded, and reported according to agreed pilot and airline privacy desires.

 

A random element is available to help ensure no two practice sessions are exactly alike—decision trees must be used every time. They are timed, scored, recorded, and reported according to agreed pilot and airline privacy desires.

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Learn, Practice, Test

Our programs also teach reactions and procedures. When in “Learn” mode, as the user goes through each step, it flashes where to look with nearby text explaining what to do. Once the pilot does the correct action, it moves to the next item. For example, in a trim runaway, the first step may be to “Grasp the control wheel,” in which case the control wheel flashes with text saying “Grasp control wheel”.

Although the primary intent is time-critical scenarios, others can be modeled as well. Users learn at their own pace until they’re performing in real time. Voluntary result sharing of pilot performance data could be used for research if the the user allows.

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iPad & Virtual Reality

A virtual reality version provides far more immersion. Pilots wear a headset and hand controllers to allow movement in the virtual cockpit. Various triggers on the hand controllers mimic buttons on the control wheel and throttles. Pilots physically move their hands, grasp and move controls in the usual directions.

More than anything, this exercises muscle memory. Plus, it’s a more powerful experience. If a window opens on takeoff, they hear the sound, see the window, and must react properly (continuing the takeoff in most cases).

VR systems are intended to be used in training centers or pilot bases, supplementing full motion simulators.

Techniques can be incorporated to fine tune reactions. For example, in a rapid depressurization, when pulling the mask out it, it’s beneficial in some airplanes to turn off the always-on intercom. The results of that can be simulated. During the memory procedure, if the pilot does not do so, a loud, distracting hissing sound will be heard when the mask is extracted.

Besides improving realism, sounds can also act as trigger for reactions. They include cockpit sounds, warnings, and outside sounds.

A tire blowing, for example, is one such stimulus in the rejected takeoff simulations to help pilots practice the need to continue at high speeds.

Scenarios can be simulated that may not involve required memory items, but where rehearsal is still beneficial. Trim runaway, for example, may require quick reaction to prevent building up of large control forces.

Screen messages can be flashed indicating that control forces are increasing or other changes are happening.